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February 20, 2020

  1. Call to Order
  2. Agenda Approval
  3. Announcement of Conflict of Interest
  4. BOARD ELECTIONS
  5. Presentations (W. Ahmed)
    1. Syphilis in Windsor Essex County
    2. Coronavirus
  6. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: January 16, 2020
  7. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS
      1. Syphilis in Windsor and Essex County (Appendices) (W. Ahmed)
      2. The WECHU Taking Action on Climate Change (K. McBeth)
      3. Media Recap
    2. RECOMMENDTION REPORTS
      1. Seasonal Housing Compliance Inspections – Fee for Service Program Introduction (K. McBeth)
  8. Business Arising – None
  9. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  10. New Business
    1. Climate Change and Health Vulnerability Report (W. Ahmed)
    2. Public Health Modernization Consultation (T. Marentette)
  11. Other Board of Health Resolutions/Letters
    1. Peterborough Public Health – Letter to Hon. Caroline Mulroney and Hon. Christine Elliott – Off Road Vehicle and Bills 107 and 132 – For Support
    2. Letter from Dr. David Williams, Chief Medical Officer of Health, Ministry of Health to Nicole Dupuis, WECHU – The Children Count Pilot Study Program – For Information
  12. Committee of the Whole (Closed Session in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
  13. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair or March 19, 2020 – Essex
  14. Adjournment


View Document page

Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

February, 2020

Subject:

January Media Relations Recap Report

January Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

59

Interview Requests

30

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

24
Requests for Information 5

January 2020 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

January 2020 Media Relations Recap - Story Source

Media Coverage

Media Outlet

Number of Requests/Stories

AM 800

11

Blackburn

7

CBC

14

CBC Radio-Canada

2

Chatham Daily News

1

CTV

6

Harrow News

1

St. Clair College/Mediaplex

3

St. Thomas Time-Journal

1

Strathroy Age Dispatch

1

Sudbury Star

1

The London Free Press

1

Toronto Star

1

Windsor Star

8

Yahoo News

1

TOTAL

59

News Release, Media Advisories and Media Statements

Date Type Headline Response

January 8, 2020

News Release

First Confirmed Influenza Death in Windsor and Essex County

6 Stories Reported

January 8, 2020

News Release

Boil Water Advisory Issued for All Users of the Wheatley Water System

4 Stories Reported

January 11, 2020

News Release

Boil Water Advisory Rescinded - Wheatley Water System

2 Stories Reported

January 14, 2020

Media Advisory

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health Meeting

8 Stories Reported

January 16, 2020

News Release

Are You Prepared? Potassium Iodide (KI) Pill Pick Up Sessions

5 Stories Reported

January 20, 2020

News Release

Start Your Quit Story this National Non-Smoking Week

1 Story Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Publish Date

Title

January 2, 2020

Increased Demand For Naloxone Says Local Pharmacist

January 8, 2020

First Confirmed Flu Death In Windsor-Essex

January 8, 2020

Boil Water Advisory Issued For Parts Of Wheatley And Leamington

January 9, 2020

First Flu Death Confirmed This Season In Windsor-Essex

January 9, 2020

Student Immunization Deadline Approaching

January 16, 2020

Local Health Unit Making KI Pills Available

January 16, 2020

Pick-Up Sessions Planned For Windsor-Essex Residents To Get Anti-Radiation Pills

January 17, 2020

Local Health Unit Wants To Make Pilot Project Permanent

January 26, 2020

Radon Study Could Result In New Building Code For Essex County

January 31, 2020

Coronavirus Risk Remains Low In Windsor-Essex

January 17, 2020

The Dan MacDonald Show - Breastfeeding Is On The Decline

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

January 7, 2020

Respiratory Illness Prompts Local Hospitals To Enact Visitor Restrictions

January 8, 2020

First Flu Death Confirmed In Windsor-Essex

January 8, 2020

Tilbury Area Boil Water Advisory Remains In Place, New One Issued For Wheatley

January 17, 2020

Health Unit Raising Radon Awareness

January 19, 2020

Breastfeeding Rates Remain Low In Windsor-Essex

January 20, 2020

KI Pill Available For Pick-Up In Windsor And Leamington

January 28, 2020

Catholic Board Responds To Coronavirus

CBC News

Note: Digital stories were not available for five of CBC’s requests.

Publish Date

Title

January 8, 2020

Hospitals In Windsor-Essex Being Strained By Spike In Flu-Related Illness

January 8, 2020

Hospitals In Windsor-Essex Being Strained By Spike In Flu-Related Illness

January 8, 2020

First Flu-Related Death In Windsor Area Confirmed By Health Unit

January 8, 2020

Boil Water Advisory Expanded To All Wheatley Water System Users

January 12, 2020

Boil Water Advisory Issued For Wheatley Water System Cancelled

January 14, 2020

How Windsor-Essex Would React To A Nuclear Emergency In Michigan

January 16, 2020

False Alarm Triggers Demand For KI Pills In Windsor Essex

January 17, 2020

Breastfeeding Rates Continuing To Decline, According To WECHU Report

January 20, 2020

A 2-Month Wait To Fix His 2 Front Teeth: The Problem With The Ontario Seniors Dental Program

Chatham Daily News

Publish Date

Title

January 15, 2020

CK Public Health Adding Voices To Its Submission On Amalgamating Health Units

CTV Windsor News

Note: Digital stories were not available for one of CTV’s requests.

Publish Date

Title

January 8, 2020

First Flu Death Confirmed This Season In Windsor-Essex

January 16, 2020

Pick-Up Sessions Planned For Windsor-Essex Residents To Get Anti-Radiation Pills

January 17, 2020

Residents, Businesses And Schools Encouraged To Test For Radon

January 23, 2020

Windsor-Essex Residents Pick Up KI Pills

January 28, 2020

High Number Of KI Pills Picked Up By Windsor-Essex Residents

The London Free Press

Publish Date

Title

January 1, 2020

More Than 47,000 Naloxone Kits Handed Out By Pharmacies in Region

St. Thomas Times-Journal

Publish Date

Title

January 1, 2020

More Than 47,000 Naloxone Kits Handed Out By Pharmacies in Region

Strathroy Age Dispatch

Publish Date

Title

January 1, 2020

More Than 47,000 Naloxone Kits Handed Out By Pharmacies in Region

Sudbury Star

Publish Date

Title

January 1, 2020

More Than 47,000 Naloxone Kits Handed Out By Pharmacies in Region

Windsor Star

Note: Digital stories were not available for one of Windsor Star’s requests.

Publish Date Title

January 7, 2020

Local ERs Cope With 'Surge' In Flu, Respiratory Cases

January 8, 2020

Windsor-Essex Health Unit Confirms Region's First Flu Death Of The Season

January 9, 2020

Boil Water Advisory Issued For Users On Wheatley Water System

January 16, 2020

Percentage Of Local Moms Breastfeeding Drops To 16.3 At Six Months

January 22, 2020

Thousands Of Local Homes Likely Have Dangerous Radon Levels: 'You've Got To Test For It'

January 20, 2020

Health Units Promote National-Non-Smoking Week With Interactive Web Page

January 23, 2020

Medical Officer Of Health Talks About Opioids Awareness

January 27, 2020

Windsor Regional Hospital Remains Vigilant With Coronavirus Protocols

January 12, 2020

Boil Water Advisory Issued For Wheatley Water System Cancelled

Note: Digital stories were not available for CBC Radio-Canada (2), Harrow News (1), St. Clair College/Mediaplex (3), or the Toronto Star (1). 

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy, Marc Tortola, and Michael Janisse.


View Document page

PREPARED BY:

Lora Piccinin, Manager of Infectious Disease Prevention/Talaya Harrold, PHN/HPS

DATE:

February 20, 2020

SUBJECT:

Syphilis in Windsor and Essex County


BACKGROUND

Sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) account for the largest burden of all Diseases of Public Health Significance (DOPHS) in Windsor and Essex County (WEC), representing 71% of all reported cases. According to the Health Protection and Promotion Act (HPPA), health care providers have a duty to report cases of STBBI’s to public health, including HIV/AIDS, Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Syphilis.

Local data shows that Syphilis is a significant concern. Syphilis is transmitted through oral, genital, and anal sex with an infected person. Syphilis can also be passed on to an unborn child, sometimes causing birth defects or death. Syphilis is normally diagnosed through a blood test and is treated with penicillin or other antibiotics. If left untreated, syphilis can progress through four stages of infection, with symptoms ranging from sores and rash to multi-organ system damage. Before 2001 syphilis cases in Ontario were rare, but rates have been on the rise. As noted in the Summary of Syphilis in Windsor and Essex County report, from 2017 to 2019, there has been a 134% increase in the crude incident rate of local Syphilis cases. During this same period, there was a 25.6% provincial increase, although the overall rate in Ontario remains higher than in WEC.

Infection of the brain and spinal cord, known as Neurosyphilis, has also been found to be of significant concern as noted in the Summary of Neurosyphilis in Windsor and Essex County report. This complication of Syphilis can result in symptoms such as headaches, dizziness, dementia, a change in personality, and difficulty coordinating muscle movements. In 2019, Neurosyphilis cases comprised nearly 10% of all Syphilis cases in WEC. This number has been steadily growing, with 5.5% and 3% of cases in 2018 and 2017 respectively. In addition to the increased number of Neurosyphilis cases, there has also been a shift in the age of those being diagnosed. From 2010 to 2018, all Neurosyphilis cases were over 45 years of age, however in 2019, half of the cases were diagnosed in individuals 20-44 years of age. 

Individuals at a higher risk of contracting Syphilis and Neurosyphilis include those engaging in unprotected sex, men having sex with men, and individuals having sex with anonymous/multiple partners. To reduce the risk of contracting and transmitting Syphilis and other STBBI’s, individual are encouraged to engage in safer sex practices such as wearing a condom and are further encouraged to get tested.

CURRENT INITIATIVES

Currently, nurses in the Infectious Disease Prevention and Clinical Services departments provide follow up of all laboratory confirmed cases of Syphilis in WEC through the provision of direct clinical services and/or by working with primary health care providers in the treatment of cases. In addition to testing and treatment, nursing staff facilitate the process of contact tracing and confidential partner notification in an effort to decrease further transmission of Syphilis and other STBBI’s.

The WECHU continues to increase community awareness of the risks associated with contracting Syphilis and other STBBIs, especially among those who engage in unprotected sex and also through physician engagement strategies that support our local health care providers in the testing, diagnosis, and treatment of Syphilis cases. Initiatives to date include media segments led by our Nurse Practitioner (NP) and educational sessions for health care providers at various Windsor Essex County Community Health Centre sites.  Additional NP led sessions are planned for the University of Windsor and St. Clair College student health services as well as Family Health Teams. In addition, Dr. Ahmed (MOH) provided an educational session at the Windsor Essex County Medical Society 2019 Annual Meeting,

A public awareness campaign is also under development. Currently data is being collected to explore clients’ baseline knowledge, risk factors and perceived barriers to engaging in safer sex practices in relation to Syphilis. This data will be utilized to direct our public messaging and communication strategy moving forward.

Approved by:

Theresa Marentette, CEO


View Document page

PREPARED BY:

Karen Lukic, Health Promotion Specialist

DATE:

February 20, 2020

SUBJECT:

The WECHU Taking Action on Climate Change


BACKGROUND

Climate change is a long-term shift in weather conditions. It can impact average temperatures, precipitation, wind, and other indicators. It is also linked to more frequent, extreme weather events such as storms that produce torrential rain and tornadoes.  Windsor and Essex County (WEC) have experienced the impacts of climate change in recent years, such as record levels of precipitation which have led to widespread flooding events. There have also been periods of extended heat and the annual blue-green algae bloom in our lakes.  These changes have also created ideal conditions for the survival of invasive mosquito species and a greater presence of insects that carry diseases not historically found in our region. WEC is the first region in Canada to identify adult Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, and have had evidence of the presence of Aedes albopictus mosquitoes since 2016.  Both of these mosquitoes are vectors for viruses not normally seen in Canada, such as Zika, Dengue fever, and Chikungunya.  These climate impacts are expected to persist and worsen as a result of past and present-day emissions (Government of Canada, 2017).

It has become necessary to take action on climate change globally and locally. These actions can have positive impacts on both the environment, and on the health and well-being of WEC residents. Initiatives and policies needed to address climate change can also help to protect human health, reduce health care costs, and improve health equity within our community. Examples include investments to protect current infrastructure from climate-related disasters, and implementing changes to building codes to increase the resiliency of buildings (Government of Canada, 2017). Changes can also be made to reduce the amount of energy we use, and the amount of waste that we generate to reduce our carbon foot print both at an individual and organizational level.

CURRENT INITIATIVES

The WECHU has taken a number of actions to address, manage, and respond to the effects of a changing climate. On November 21, 2019 the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health passed a Local Response to Climate Change Resolution that supports ongoing advocacy efforts and public health interventions to support climate change action locally. These initiatives and programs, implemented in collaboration with key community partners, will support municipalities, local organizations, and individuals to take action and raise awareness levels about the health impacts of climate change.

The WECHU has also conducted a Climate Change and Health Vulnerability Assessment which will be used to identify and understand the impacts that a changing climate will have on the health of the WEC population, and identify those populations most vulnerable to negative health effects. Data from this assessment will be used to develop action plans for the various health impacts affecting our region.

In addition to these broader initiatives, internally, the Health Unit has implemented several changes in recent years to reduce our organization’s environmental impact. Examples include:

  • Creation and implementation of policies that reduce the number of vehicles on the road (e.g. staff carpooling, the use of web conferencing technology)
  • Reduction of energy consumption through conversion of office lighting to LED, and the use of power-saving modes for office equipment
  • Reduction of single-use plastics, and supporting staff to drink more water and less sugar sweetened beverages through the installation of water bottle filling stations within our buildings and removal of beverage vending machines
  • Reduction in office waste by providing ample resources for staff to recycle paper, plastics, glass, and batteries
  • Installation of bike racks at each of the 3 Health Unit offices to encourage active transportation

Looking ahead, the organization will continue to consider its environmental impacts and updates that can be made to our policies, procedures and programs with our new workspace to reflect our organizational commitment. Examples include:

  • Implementation of environmentally friendly purchasing policies that encourage buying local, recyclable goods, reducing waste from food/single-use plastics and put an emphasis on reducing the organizations carbon footprint
  • A building design that conserves energy and water (e.g. LED lighting, use of natural lighting, solar panels, light sensors, power save features on office equipment, low flow toilets and faucets)
  • Allowing for natural, green spaces where possible in the design and incorporating building infrastructure that support staff and client active transportation such as biking and walking

Approved by:

Therese Marentette, CEO

References

Government of Canada (2017) Adapting to the effects of climate change.  Retrieved on January 13, 2020. https://www.canada.ca/en/services/environment/weather/climatechange/climate-action/adapting-to-effects.html


View Document page

January 16, 2020

  1. Call to Order
  2. Agenda Approval
  3. Announcement of Conflict of Interest
  4. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: December 19, 2019
  5. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS
      1. Breastfeeding in Windsor-Essex (N. Dupuis)
      2. Radon Gas Initiatives in Windsor-Essex County (K. McBeth)
      3. Media Recap (Handout)
    2. RECOMMENDTION REPORTS
      1. Children Count Pilot Project (N. Dupuis)
  6. Business Arising – None
  7. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  8. New Business
    1. Public Health Modernization Update (T. Marentette) (Handout)
    2. Board of Health Elections (February 20, 2020 Board meeting)
  9. Other Board of Health Resolutions/Letters – For Support
    1. Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit – Letter to Hon. Minister Patty Hajdu, Minister of Health – National Pharmacare Program
  10. Committee of the Whole (Closed Session in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
  11. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair or February 20, 2020 – Windsor
  12. Adjournment

View Document page

Prepared By:

Jennifer Jacob, Nutritionist

Date:

January 16, 2020

Subject:

Breastfeeding in Windsor-Essex

BACKGROUND

The World Health Organization and Health Canada recommend exclusive breastfeeding for an infant’s first six months of life, with continued breastfeeding up to two years and beyond (WHO, 2019). Promotion and support of breastfeeding is an important part of healthy growth and development, providing unique benefits for both the infant and mother. Some of the benefits of breastfeeding include a decrease in risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS); reduced risk of many childhood illnesses; healthy brain growth and development; and also contributes to a lower risk of chronic diseases for both the infant and mother in later ages.

Despite the benefits of breastfeeding and recommendation for exclusive breastfeeding to 6 months, rates remain consistently low in Windsor-Essex County (WEC) with just 16.3% of women reporting exclusive breastfeeding at six months post-partum (BORN, 2018). Exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge have remained low over the past years. In 2017, 57.4% of women were exclusively breastfeeding at hospital discharge, significantly lower than the provincial average at 61.2%; in 2018, this rate declined a further 5%. At two months post-partum rates of exclusive breastfeeding in WEC drops to 25.7% (BORN, 2018). 

In 2018, the WECHU received its Baby-Friendly Initiative (BFI) designation. As part of maintaining this designation and requirements in the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS), ongoing monitoring of local breastfeeding rates has been established using BORN and our internally administered infant feeding survey.  Additionally, the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (WECHU) in 2019, committed to reviewing all breastfeeding services provided by the Healthy Families department to ensure programs and services best met the needs of the community. This included an Environmental Scan, in partnership with the Windsor Essex-County Children and Youth Planning Committee, and a Literature Review. Based on the results from our findings, the following initiatives were identified to address the decline in exclusive breastfeeding rates and improve supports for expecting mothers and new parents.

CURRENT INITIATIVES

Collaborating with local hospitals to improve breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge: In 2020, the health unit and Windsor Regional Hospital will offer monthly prenatal breastfeeding classes to prepare women to navigate common breastfeeding challenges within the first 24 hours and beyond. Additionally, the Health Unit will also offer Family Birthing Centre nursing staff with breastfeeding training to improve their ability to assist mothers with breastfeeding initiation and help to build mothers’ breastfeeding self-efficacy, a key predictor of breastfeeding duration (RNAO, 2018).

Policy and Supportive environments: Using the RNAO Breastfeeding Practice Guidelines (2018), the health unit will provide recommendations to Family Birthing Centres to create or improve policies, protocols and procedures to better support a women’s intention to breastfeed.

Improving access to in-person lactation consultation: In 2020, the health unit Lactation Consultant’s (LC) in addition to providing in-house clinic support will also provide home visits for women who have significant barriers to accessing services at the health unit offices. Such barriers may include, mothers who are geographically isolated, have multiple children, and or suffer from a physical ailment or mental health concern. Furthermore, WECHU has added a third LC position to help promote and support exclusivity rates for our breastfeeding families.

Increasing awareness about breastfeeding services in Windsor-Essex County: In 2020, a targeted awareness campaign will be launched to improve awareness about our services among priority populations. In addition to targeted bus and social media ads, the health unit will send promotional material to doctors’ offices and community groups in priority neighbourhoods. Evaluation will be incorporated into existing services to ensure priority groups are accessing these services.

CONSULTATION:

The following individuals were consulted in the development this report: Felicia Lawal, Manager, Healthy Families, Amanda Ryall, Manager, Healthy Families, Nicole Dupuis, Director of Health Promotion.

APPROVED BY:

Theresa Marentette, CEO

References:

Newhook, Newhook, Midodzi et al. (2017). Poverty and Breastfeeding: Comparing Determinants of Early Breastfeeding Cessation Incidence in Socioeconomically Marginalized and Privileged Populations in the FINal Study. Health Equity, 1(1).

Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO)(2018). Breastfeeding - Promoting and Supporting the Initiation, Exclusivity, and Continuation of Breastfeeding for Newborns, Infants, and Young Children. 3rd Edition. Toronto, ON. 


View Document page

Prepared By:

Karen Lukic, Health Promotion Specialist, Environmental Health

Date:

January 16, 2020

Subject:

Radon Gas Initiatives in Windsor-Essex County

BACKGROUND

Radon is a radioactive gas produced when naturally occurring uranium, found in soil and rock, decays. It can’t be seen, smelled or tasted and is in nearly every home across Canada. According to Health Canada (2014), long-term exposure to radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking and the primary cause for non-smokers. Health Canada has set the Canadian guideline for radon levels in the home at 200 Bequerels per cubic metre (Bq/m3).

In a cross-Canada study released by Health Canada in 2012, 13.8% of homes tested in Windsor-Essex County (WEC) had radon levels at or above 200 Bq/m3 (Health Canada, 2012). This number was comparable to results from the 3-year Radon: Know Your Level study conducted by the WECHU’s Environmental Health Department that found 11% of homes tested in Windsor-Essex County (n=2,364) had levels at or above 200 Bq/m3 (WECHU, 2018).

The WECHU coordinates the monitoring and surveillance of environmental exposures of public health significance, such as radon, and provides the public with education and mitigation options. These activities are required in the Health Hazard Response Protocol, 2018 and Healthy Environments and Climate Change Guideline, 2018.

In February 2019, the WECHU Board of Health passed a recommendation resolution that included a number of progressive public health activities to reduce exposures and risks related to radon exposure in our community including advocating for municipal and public policy updates on testing and mitigation systems and increases to provincial requirements related to acceptable radon levels in newly built homes and buildings.

CURRENT INITIATIVES

Using results from the Radon: Know Your Level study, the WECHU conducted a radon education and advocacy session with members of the Sun Parlour chapter of the Ontario Building Officials Association (OBOA). The Sun Parlour chapter membership is comprised of the Chief Building Officials from the City of Windsor, and 8 municipalities in Windsor-Essex and Chatham-Kent County. The session included a presentation on our study findings and the WECHU’s recommendations for action such as:

  • Changes to municipal building code to include rough-ins for radon mitigation systems in all new residential builds.
  • Radon testing in municipally owned public buildings or buildings with on-site municipal staff.
  • Partnering with school boards, licensed child care centres, and public libraries to encourage radon testing.

As a result of this education and advocacy session, the City of Windsor and all municipalities represented in the Sun Parlour chapter unanimously agreed to adopt a radon rough-in requirement for all new residential construction starting January 1, 2020.
All new home builders will have to comply with this requirement in order to receive approval from the municipal building inspector.  The WECHU, in partnership with the Sun Parlour Chapter, will design radon information labels for distribution to building contractors. These labels will be attached to the radon rough-in pipe system to inform new homeowners of the existence of the roughed-in system and provide direction to homeowners if action is required.

Residents of WEC continue to receive education about radon and its risks, where to purchase testing kits, as well as information about mitigation options for homes with high radon levels. This information is currently available on the WECHU’s website and reinforced each November in recognition of Radon Action Month through a variety of free and social media methods.

APPROVED BY:

Theresa Marentette, CEO


View Document page

Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

January 6, 2020

Subject:

December Media Relations Recap Report

December Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

37

Interview Requests

18

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

17
Requests for Information 2

December 2019 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

December 2019 Media Relations Recap - Story Source

Media Coverage

Media Outlet

Number of Requests/Stories

AM 800

6

Blackburn

6

CBC

7

Chatham Daily News

1

Chatham This Week

1

CTV

8

Windsor Star

8

TOTAL

37

News Release, Media Advisories and Media Statements

Date Type Headline Response

December 3, 2019

News Release

Having A Food Drive? Make Your Donations Count!

0 Stories Reported

December 11, 2019

News Release

First Case of Influenza A Confirmed

5 Stories Reported

December 17, 2019

Media Advisory

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health Meeting

9 Stories Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Publish Date

Title

December 11, 2019

First Flu Case Identified By Windsor Essex County Health Unit

December 16, 2019

Healthy Donation Tips For Area Food Banks

December 20, 2019

Windsor Father's Cautionary Tale About Vaccine Timing

December 20, 2019

Health Unit Asks Province To Keep Supporting Kid's Dental Program

December 20, 2019

Health Unit Says Cost Of Living On The Rise In Windsor-Essex

December 30, 2019

New Ban On Promoting Vaping Products Take Effect Jan. 1

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

December 2, 2019

High Number Of Drug-Related ER Visits This Weekend

December 11, 2019

Influenza A Confirmed In Windsor-Essex

December 18, 2019

Extreme Cold: Where To Go, What To Do

December 18, 2019

A 'Prolonged Dislocation' For Westcourt Place Residents

December 20, 2019

Living Wage In Windsor-Essex To Increase Minimally In 2020

December 26, 2019

Giving To A Food Bank? Here's What They Need

CBC News

Note: Digital stories were not available for two of CBC’s requests.

Publish Date

Title

December 3, 2019

Alert Triggered For Increase In Drug-Related Emergency Visits In Windsor

December 11, 2019

First Case Of Influenza A Confirmed In Windsor-Essex

December 18, 2019

3.6% Tax Hike Proposed For City Of Windsor 2020 Budget

December 22, 2019

Michigan Marijuana Regulator Recalls Vaping Product; None Recalled In Windsor

December 20, 2019

Cost Of Healthy Food Increased 8.8% in Windsor-Essex In 2019

Chatham Daily News

Publish Date

Title

December 13, 2019

Potassium Iodide Pills Distributed To Residents

Chatham This Week​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

Publish Date

Title

 

December 13, 2019

Few People Taking Advantage Of Potassium Iodide Tablets

 

CTV Windsor News

Note: Digital stories were not available for two of CTV’s requests.

Publish Date

Title

December 11, 2019

Health Unit Confirms First Flu Case Of Season In Windsor-Essex

December 13, 2019

ACW Workshop Aims To Tackle Opioid Use Stigma, Enhance Preparedness

December 19, 2019

These are some options for Windsor's Homeless In Extreme Cold

December 20, 2019

Rising Food Prices Concern Windsor-Essex County Health Unit

December 20, 2019

Calls For Province To Keep Supporting Children's Dental Program

December 30, 2019

New Ban On Promoting Vaping Products Take Effect Jan. 1

Windsor Star

Note: Digital stories were not available for one of Windsor Star’s requests.

Publish Date Title

December 2, 2019

Health Unit Issues Fourth Alert For High Overdose Rates Within A Month

December 3, 2019

Windsor Firefighters Want To Carry Naloxone

December 4, 2019

Local Paramedics Use Opioid Overdose Antidote Every Couple Of Days

December 11, 2019

Health Unit Confirms First Flu Case Of The Season

December 16, 2019

Health Unit, Food Banks Suggest Healthier Food Donations

December 19, 2019

Cost Of Health Eating In Windsor-Essex Up Almost Nine Per Cent

December 25, 2019

Provincial Downloading Threatens Local Kids' Oral Health

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy, Marc Tortola, and Michael Janisse.


View Document page

Board Members Present:

Gary McNamara, Joe Bachetti, Rino Bortolin, Fabio Costante, Dr. Debbie Kane, Gary Kaschak, Judy Lund, John Scott, Ed Sleiman, Larry Snively 

Board Member Regrets:

Tracey Bailey

Administration Present:

Theresa Marentette, Dr. Wajid Ahmed, Lorie Gregg, Nicole Dupuis, Kristy McBeth, Dan Sibley, Lee Anne Damphouse 


QUORUM:  Confirmed

  1. Call to Order
    Board Chair, Gary McNamara, called the meeting to order at 5:03 p.m.
  2. Agenda Approval
    Moved by: Ed Sleiman
    Seconded by: Gary Kaschak
    That the agenda be approved.
    CARRIED
  3. Announcement of Conflicts of Interest – None
  4. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: December 19, 2019
      Moved by: Judy Lund
      Seconded by: Rino Bortolin
      That the minutes be approved.
      CARRIED
  5. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS
      The following information reports were presented to the Board.
      1. Breastfeeding in Windsor Essex (N. Dupuis)
        Brought to the Board for information.
      2. Radon Gas Initiatives in Windsor Essex County (K. McBeth)
        Brought to the Board for information.
        F. Costante asked if the WECHU will be running another campaign to distribute Radon kits or if any audits of homes will be conducted in the future since, according to studies, our region is twice the provincial average for acceptable Radon levels. T. Marentette advised that the WECHU’s 3 year campaign on Radon is complete and our campaigns are now focused on educating the community. Radon Kits are readily available at local hardware stores and are approximately $40 each.
        J. Lund asked if the WECHU can encourage appropriate levels of government to create programs to test for Radon levels and offer incentives to home owners to make upgrades/repairs to their homes. G. McNamara said that the WECHU can write a letter of request to make a recommendation, but this would be at the will of the government.
        Moved by: Fabio Costante
        Seconded by: Judy Lund
        That the Windsor Essex County Health Unit prepare a Letter of Recommendation to the appropriate Provincial body requesting support for Radon mitigation in the Province of Ontario
        CARRIED
      3. Media Recap
        Brought to the Board for information.
        Moved by: John Scott
        Seconded by: Larry Snively
        That the Information Reports be received.
        CARRIED
    2. RECOMMENDATION/RESOLUTION REPORTS
      1. Children Count Pilot Project (N. Dupuis)
        N. Dupuis brought forward the Children Count Pilot Project Resolution for Board of Health approval.
        N. Dupuis acknowledged R. D’Souza for the significant amount of work dedicated to this project over the past 5 years. G. McNamara commended N. Dupuis and her team,
        noting that the gauge is poverty and Windsor Essex leads the provincial average in key issues like childhood obesity, diabetes and healthy eating.
        Moved by: Rino Bortolin
        Seconded by: Ed Sleiman
        That the Recommendation/Resolution Report be supported.
        CARRIED
  6. Business Arising – None
  7. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  8. New Business
    1. Public Health Modernization Update (T. Marentette)
      This item on the agenda has been moved for discussion in Committee of the Whole.
    2. Board of Health Elections 2020 (T. Marentette)
      G. McNamara noted that Board Elections will take place at the February 20, 2020 Board of Health meeting. Nominations will be accepted between now and the February board meeting.
      Moved by: Rino Bortolin
      Seconded by: Fabio Costante
      That the above information be received.
      CARRIED
  9. Other Board of Health Resolutions/Letters – For Support
    1. Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit – Letter to Hon. Minister Patty Hajdu, Minister of Health – National Pharmacare Program
      Moved by: Rino Bortolin
      Seconded by: Larry Snively
      That the above correspondence be supported as noted.
      CARRIED
  10. Additions to Agenda (G. McNamara)
    1. Flu Season Update
      G. McNamara requested an update on this year’s flu season. Dr. Ahmed noted that there are 39 confirmed Influenza cases locally, about 50/50 of both strains A and B. This has been a typical flu season so far and we will continue to monitor. Since the flu season typically runs into April, it is still not too late to receive the flu shot. We continue to monitor the recent outbreak in Wuhan China and we receive regular updates. There have been 14 cases of the virus in China, 2 in Thailand and 1 in Japan.
    2. Pickering Nuclear Generating Station – False Alarm
      The recent alert regarding the false alarm at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, and our close proximity to the US Fermi 2 Nuclear Power Plant, has prompted individuals in our community to request Potassium Iodide (KI) Pills. The health unit has received 400 calls this week and we have organized 3 sessions for individuals to pick up KI pills. There will be 2 sessions in Windsor and 1 in Leamington and the information is our website.
  11. Committee of the Whole (CLOSED SESSION, in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
    The Board moved into Committee of the Whole at 5:26 pm
    The Board moved out of Committee of the Whole at 5:58 pm
  12. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair, or February 20, 2020 in Windsor, Ontario
  13. Adjournment
    Moved by: Joe Bachetti
    Seconded by: John Scott
    That the meeting be adjourned
    CARRIED
    The meeting adjourned at 6:00 pm.

RECORDING SECRETARY:

SUBMITTED BY:

APPROVED BY:


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ISSUE

The behaviours initiated in youth create a foundation for health through the life course (Toronto Public Health, 2015). Supporting student achievement and improving overall quality of life for children and youth is a priority shared across multiple sectors, including health and education. Both the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Education have identified the importance of this stage of development through the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) and the Ontario Curriculum (2019), and the interrelationship between health, well-being and educational outcomes. Collecting, analyzing and reporting data at the local level is essential for the planning, delivery and evaluation of effective and efficient services that meet the unique needs of students and ensure the responsible public stewardship of the resources allocated to these services (Windsor-Essex, 2017). The lack of a coordinated provincial system for the assessment and monitoring of child and youth health that meets local needs has been the focus of many reports, including the 2017 Annual Report of the Ontario Auditor General. The Auditor General’s report identified that children are a public health priority population and that epidemiological data on children are not readily available to public health units for planning and measuring effective programming (Office of the Auditor General of Ontario, 2017).

In the initial report, Children Count: Assessing Child and Youth Surveillance Gaps for Ontario Public Health Units (Populations Health Assessment LDCP Team, 2017), public health units and school boards identified a need for local data related to mental health, physical activity and healthy eating for school-aged children and youth. In 2017, the Children Count Locally Driven Collaborative Projects (LDCP) Team convened a Task Force of leaders in education, public health, research, government and non-governmental organizations to explore solutions and make recommendations for improving assessment and monitoring of child and youth health. The Task Force recommendations have been endorsed by many organizations including the Council of Directors of Education (CODE) and Council of Medical Officers of Health (COMOH). In their report, the Children Count Task Force (Children Count Task Force, 2019) recommended building on existing infrastructure by using the Ministry of Education’s mandated school climate survey (SCS). The SCS provides population level data for children and youth grades 4 to 12 and represents a significant opportunity to understand local health needs of students.

BACKGROUND

In follow up to this previous work, the Children Count LDCP Team, with a renewal grant from Public Health Ontario (PHO), embarked upon The Children Count Pilot Study Project. The Children Count Pilot Study began in December 2017 with the goal to explore the feasibility of coordinated monitoring and assessment of child and youth health, utilizing the SCS, to address local health data gaps. This provincial project included six school board and public health unit pairings who developed and piloted a Healthy Living Module (HLM) as part of the school board’s SCS. The HLM covered the topics previously prioritized of mental health, healthy eating, and physical activity.

The objectives of the Pilot Study were:

  1. To work collaboratively to develop a HLM for the SCS;
  2. To pilot test and evaluate the applicability and feasibility of the partnership between public health units and school boards in coordinated monitoring and assessment utilizing the SCS; and 
  3. To develop a toolkit for implementation of coordinated monitoring and assessment for health service planning using the SCS for child and youth health in Ontario.

Using a Participatory Action Research (PAR) model, the steering committee (comprised of school board and public health leadership), worked together to build the HLM. The HLM was successfully integrated into the SCS led by participating school boards. Collaboratively school boards and local public health units analyzed and interpreted the results for knowledge sharing and planning.

The HLM enriched each school boards’ SCS and identified areas for further work to support student health and well-being. The process of piloting the HLM with multiple and diverse school boards using different methods demonstrated that the overall process of coordinating a HLM into the SCS is feasible and adaptable to suit local needs while still enabling consistency in data across regions. The Children Count Pilot Project captured the process and lessons learned in their final report (December 2019) as well as developed the Children Count Pilot Study Project: Healthy Living Module Toolkit as a guide for school boards and health units across the province.

PROPOSED MOTION

Whereas, boards of health are required under the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) to collect and analyze health data for children and youth to monitor trends over time, and

Whereas, boards of health require local population health data for planning evidence-informed, culturally and locally appropriate health services and programs, and

Whereas, addressing child and youth health and well-being is a priority across multiple sectors, including education and health, and

Whereas, Ontario lacks a single coordinated system for the monitoring and assessment of child and youth health and well-being, and

Whereas, there is insufficient data on child and youth health and well-being at the local, regional and provincial level, and

Whereas, the Children Count Pilot Study Project, Healthy Living Module is a feasible approach to fulfill local, regional and provincial population health data gaps for children and youth, and

Now therefore be it resolved that the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health receives and endorses the Healthy Living Module, and

FURTHER THAT, the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health encourage the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Education to adopt the Healthy Living Module as part of the Ontario Public Health Standards and the Ontario School Climate Survey.

References

  • Children Count Task Force. (2019). Children Count: Task Force Recommendations. Windsor, ON: Windsor-Essex County Health Unit.
  • Office of the Auditor General (2017). Annual Report 2017. Toronto: Queen’s Printer for Ontario.
  • Ministry of Education. (2019). The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8: Health and Physical Education.
  • Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. (2018). Ontario Public Health Standards: Requirements for Programs, Services, and Accountability. Toronto: Queen’s Printer for Ontario.
  • Population Health Assessment LDCP Team (2017). Children Count: Assessing Child and youth Surveillance Gaps for Ontario Public Health Units. Windsor, ON: Windsor-Essex County Health Unit
  • Toronto Public Health. (2015). Healthy Futures: 2014 Toronto Public Health Student Survey. Toronto: Toronto Public Health

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December 19, 2019

  1. Call to Order
  2. Agenda Approval
  3. Announcement of Conflict of Interest
  4. Presentation: WECHU Staff Long-Term Services Awards
    (T. Marentette/ G. McNamara)
  5. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: November 21, 2019
  6. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS
      1. Windsor and Essex County Living Wage Program (N. Dupuis)
        •Appendix A – Calculating a Living Wage for Windsor-Essex
      2. 2019 Nutritious Food Basket and the Real Cost of Eating Well in Windsor-Essex (N. Dupuis)
        • Appendix A – The Real Cost of Eating Well in Windsor-Essex
      3. Q3 Financial Results (L. Gregg)
      4. 2019 Operational Plan Reporting Q3 Status (T. Marentette)
        •2019 Operational Plan Reporting – Q3 Status Report
      5. 2019 Q3 Strategic Plan Report (T. Marentette)
        •2019 Q3 Strategic Plan Progress Report
      6. Upcoming 2020 Board of Health Competency Self-Evaluation (T. Marentette)
      7. Lead in Drinking Water (W. Ahmed/K. McBeth)
      8. Media Recap
    2. RECOMMENDTION REPORTS
      1. Healthy Smiles Ontario Funding (N. Dupuis)
  7. Business Arising – None
  8. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  9. New Business
    1. Strategic Planning Committee – Vacancies (2) for Board of Health Representatives (T. Marentette)
  10. Other Board of Health Resolutions/Letters – For Support
    1. City of Hamilton, Office of the Mayor – Letter to Hon. Minister Christine Elliott – Opposition to Co-Payment for Dentures Under the New Ontario Seniors Dental Care Program
    2. City of Hamilton, Office of the Mayor – Letter to Hon. Minister Patty Hajdu – Endorsement of Comprehensive Measures to Address the Rise of Vaping in Canada
    3. Sudbury and District Health Units – Letter to Hon. Minister Christine Elliott – E-Cigarette and Aerosolized Product Prevention and Cessation
  11. Committee of the Whole (Closed Session in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act) 71
  12. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair or January 16, 2020 – Windsor
  13. Adjournment

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Prepared By:

Phil Wong, Environmental Health Manager

Date:

December 19, 2019

Subject:

Lead in Drinking Water

BACKGROUND

According to Health Canada, lead in drinking water should be kept as low as reasonably achievable. The most significant contribution of lead in drinking water is generally from lead service lines that supply drinking water to your home. The best approach to eliminate lead exposure is to remove and replace the full lead service line. Lead service lines have not been used for many years but older homes and buildings (pre-1948) may still have lead pipes and service lines. Lead solder and brass fittings/fixtures are also common sources of lead exposure. This report will highlight some of the key regulations and provide some clarification on how lead exceedances are handled in the province of Ontario.

Standards vs. Guidelines and Duty to Report

The Canadian guideline for lead in drinking water was lowered in June 2019 to 5ppb (0.005mg/L) or as low as reasonably achievable. In Ontario, the Drinking Water Quality Standards Reg. 169/03 and the Safe Drinking Water Act, 2002, have the maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for lead in drinking water as 10ppb (0.010mg/L). All municipal drinking water systems and designated facilities are legally required to meet the 10ppb MAC. Under the Act, all drinking water system operators have a duty to report microbiological, chemical and radiological exceedances to their local public health unit and the Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP). The WECHU’s role is to give direction, in the event of an exceedance, on corrective action to eliminate/reduce any health effects.

Municipal Systems

The Drinking Water Systems Reg. 170/03 outlines the sampling protocol and testing requirements for municipal drinking water systems. The MECP regulates these systems and calls for the implementation of an extended lead testing-program. Targeted testing and sampling is conducted by municipal drinking water operators in each municipality, and any lead service lines are replaced when identified. Homeowners on municipal systems are encouraged to contact their local providers for options on lead sampling and other services. Homeowners are notified by the municipal drinking water operator and the health unit if lead is identified through operator sampling. 

Schools and Child Care Centres

Schools and child care centres are required to sample their water for lead as per Ontario Regulation 243/07: Schools, Private Schools and Child Care Centres. This regulation, recently amended in 2017, increased lead sampling requirements in these facilities. There is a requirement for annual sampling and testing of lead in drinking water to ensure lead levels are below the provincial Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standards Reg. 169/03. It also requires flushing of plumbing in schools to help reduce lead levels in drinking water. Flushing has been shown to reduce lead levels in water and is a recognized lead reduction strategy. Schools and child care centres have replaced service lines, decommissioned fountains, installed NSF POU filters and have bottle filling stations when lead exceedances have been identified. The regulation is enforced by the MECP as schools and child care centres are designated facilities, and the health unit takes a lead role to provide guidance on health related issues.

Private Water Supplies

Homeowners using private water supplies within Ontario can send water samples for lead testing to an accredited private laboratory from the MECP list. There is a cost associated with lead testing at a private laboratory. Private homeowners can submit water samples to the Public Health Ontario Laboratory for bacteriological testing (E. coli and total coliforms) and this service is free for all private drinking water systems.

CURRENT INITIATIVES

Under the Ontario Public Health Standard’s Safe Drinking Water and Fluoride Monitoring Protocol, the health unit is mandated to provide 24/7 on-call support and response to all adverse drinking water events. Where water intended for human consumption may not be safe to consume, the health unit is required under the Health Protection Promotion Act to respond. The health unit initiates a response within 24 hours of receiving notification of any adverse event in the region. Boil Water and Drinking Water advisories, as well as legal orders to drinking water system operators, are issued regularly to prevent exposures to any microbiological, chemical or radiological exceedances. The health unit continues to work with municipal drinking water system operators, school boards and private well owners to provide awareness and education on safe drinking water.  

For more information on safe drinking water please visit the sites below:

APPROVED BY

Theresa Marentette


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Prepared By:

Neil Mackenzie, Manager, Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention

Date:

December 19, 2019

Subject:

2019 Nutritious Food Basket and the Real Cost of Eating Well in Windsor-Essex

BACKGROUND

Nutritious Food Basket – Description

As part of the Population Health Assessment and Surveillance Protocol, 2018, under the modernized Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS), boards of health are required to monitor food affordability at a local level. The Ministry of Health and Long Term Care provides guidance for determining the Nutritious Food Basket in its guidance document: Monitoring Food Affordability Reference Document, 2018 (MOHLTC, 2018).

Each year, the WECHU releases its calculation for the Nutritious Food Basket. Food costing tools, such as the Nutritious Food Basket (MOHLTC, 2008), measure the cost of basic healthy eating representing current nutrition recommendations and average food purchasing patterns. It allows for improved understanding of the real cost of eating a basic nutritious diet for a reference family and those of different ages, gender, and physiological status (i.e., pregnant, breast feeding) within Windsor-Essex County. 

Over a two-week period in May 2019, the WECHU’s Registered Dietitians (RD) surveyed nine different grocery stores within the city and county. Stores are selected following the NFB protocol, ensuring representation of all types of grocery stores (i.e., high-end, discount, community based). Using the NFB costing tool, the average cost of the lowest price available for 67 different food items is calculated. Once the average price is determined, different income and family scenarios for our local community are calculated.

Nutritious Food Basket – 2019 Reality

The cost of healthy eating for a family of four in Windsor and Essex County was calculated to be $211.20 per week. This represents an increase of $17.16/week (8.8 %) over the previous year’s calculation. The 2019 Nutritious Food Basket cost ($211.20/week) is 12.3% higher than the cost in 2014 ($188.04/week). Over that same period, rental costs in WEC have increased by 18.9%, and Ontario Works benefits have only increased by 7.8%.  Households who are reliant on social assistance as their main source of income are at a greater risk for food insecurity than households who receive income from employment (PROOF Food Insecurity Policy Research, 2017).

Note: The NFB does not include items such as spices, sauces, condiments, processed and ready-to-eat foods, baby food and formula, personal hygiene, and cleaning products.

The increase in the cost of the Nutritious Food Basket for 2019 has a real impact, in that healthy eating will continue to be unattainable by many in our community. For example, a family of four* receiving Ontario Works has an average monthly household income of $2,623. When rent is accounted for, the family would be left with only $1,533 to cover the cost of food ($914.50) and all other remaining expenses, including utilities, transportation costs, medical expenses, clothing, etc. The reality is much worse for a single adult male receiving Ontario Works. After accounting for rent, the individual is left with only $225 to cover all remaining expenses, including food. This amount is less than the cost of the Nutritious Food Basket for an adult male ($306.93/month). Indeed, the individual would be left with no money at all for other basic expenses. With less money for food, the quality and quantity of foods purchased are compromised, causing individuals to turn to other options such as food banks or missing meals to make ends meet. 

CURRENT INITIATIVES

The NFB data is intended to raise awareness about the cost of basic healthy eating in our community.  This data can be used to assist policy and decision makers to advocate for improved social assistance rates, living wage uptake, more affordable housing availability, accessible and affordable child care, affordable and flexible utility costs, and other supports to ensure everyone has enough money available to meet their family’s basic nutrition needs.

The NFB has been used as an essential local component in the calculation of the Windsor-Essex County Living Wage for 2020.

A plan is in place to disseminate the 2019 NFB results and the Real Cost of Eating Well in Windsor-Essex to a variety of partners, organizations, and municipal councils who can use the information to support the most vulnerable individuals in our community. The information provided will help inform an urgent discussion on short and longer-term measures required to support individuals and families in having sufficient funds for a basic healthy diet. 

CONSULTATION:

The following individuals were contributed to this report:

  • Heather Nadon, Public Health Dietitian
  • Noura Jabbour, Public Health Dietitian
  • Neil Makenzie, Manager, Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention

APPENDICES

APPROVED BY

Theresa Marentette


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Prepared By:

Neil Mackenzie, Manager, Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention

Date:

December 19, 2019

Subject:

Windsor and Essex County Living Wage Program

BACKGROUND

Income inequality has been recognized as one of the most significant social determinants contributing to poorer population health outcomes. As such, many communities across Ontario, nationally, and internationally have implemented living wage programs aimed to raise awareness, encourage adoption, and advance healthy public policy. In 2017, the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (WECHU) agreed to take over the administration of the Windsor and Essex County Living Wage program from Pathway to Potential; Windsor and Essex County’s Social Investment Plan. The program re-launched in March 2018, and as of November 2019, there are 27 Certified Living Wage Employers.

CURRENT INITIATIVES

The 2020 Living Wage calculated for Windsor and Essex County is $15.52/hour for full and part time employees that do not receive health benefits from their employer. This represents a .37 cent per hour (2.4%) increase over the 2019 Living Wage. The 2020 Living Wage for full and part time employees who receive health benefits from their employer remains at $14.00/hour (current provincial minimum wage).

Purpose: To raise awareness about the minimum salary required to increase the likelihood of having a basic standard of living in Windsor and Essex County, and to advance policies, partnerships, and practices that promote health and well-being for our community.

Key Program Deliverables

Each year the living wage calculation is updated and shared with the community. See the attached Calculating a Living Wage for Windsor and Essex County 2020 report (Appendix A). The report is intended to provide an overview of the Living Wage, how it’s calculated, and assumptions that are made in the calculations. It is anticipated that the report will help raise awareness about the importance of paying at least a Living wage to all employees, in order to increase the likelihood that they can meet the basic cost of living in Windsor and Essex County.

The Living Wage Certification Program includes:

  • Promotion and recruitment activities;
  • An online intake and enrollment process;
  • Verification that applicants meet program eligibility criteria;
  • Support for employer implementation;
  • An employer Living Wage Certification package;
  • Program evaluation and reporting activities to support quality improvement; and,
  • Recognition at the annual Gord Smith Healthy Workplace and Bike Friendly Awards.

KEY CALCULATION CHANGES FOR 2020

In order to better support local communities in the Living Wage Calculation process, the Ontario Living Wage Network (OLWN) reviewed and updated the living wage calculation methodology in 2018.  This change allows local communities to spend less time calculating the living wage and helps standardize calculations throughout the province.

CONSULTATION

Members of the CAC serve in a consultative capacity, providing recommendations and advice to the WECHU Living Wage program administration team.  The most recent CAC meeting was held on October 24, 2019. At that meeting, the WECHU team delivered a presentation outlining the 2020 Living Wage calculation and relevant changes. They also shared the 2019 Living Wage evaluation report. The plan for promoting and recruiting Living Wage employers for 2020 was discussed.  Group feedback and discussion resulted in valuable input and advice that will be incorporated into the 2020 Living Wage Program.

Note: not all members of the CAC attended the meetings referred to above.

Community Advisory Committee Membership

  • Judy Lund (Working Toward Wellness Committee)
  • Michelle Suchiu (Executive Director, Workforce WindsorEssex)
  • Stephen Lynn (Coordinator of Social Planning, City of Windsor)
  • Jelena Payne (The Community Development and Health Commissioner, City of Windsor)
  • Luciano Carlone (Director of Finance and Corporate Services, Canadian Mental Health Association - Windsor-Essex County Branch)
  • Lorraine Goddard (CEO, United Way/Centraide Windsor-Essex County)
  • Robert Ross (Windsor-Essex Food Policy Council)
  • Greg Schlosser (Director, Human Resources, County of Essex)

The following individuals contributed to this report: Nicole Dupuis, Marc Frey, Neil MacKenzie, Ramsey D’Souza, Saamir Pasha, and Cathy Bennett.

APPENDICES

  • Appendix A – Calculating a Living Wage for Windsor and Essex County 2020 - Report coming soon

APPROVED BY:

Theresa Marentette, CEO


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Prepared By:

Lorie Gregg, Director of Corporate Services

Date:

December 19, 2019

Subject:

Q3 Financial Results

BACKGROUND

The Leadership Team of the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (“the WECHU”) monitors financial results on an on-going basis for the following programs:

  • Mandatory programs funded to a maximum of 75% (“Cost-Shared”) by the Ministry of Health and 25% by  the Corporation of the City of Windsor, the Corporation of the County of Essex and the Corporation of the Township of Pelee (hereinafter referred to as the “Obligated Municipalities”);
  • Related programs funded 100% by the Ministry of Health;
  • Related programs funded 100% by the Ministry of Children, Community and Social Services (“MCCSS”).
  • One-time business cases funded 100% by the Ministry of Health.

The third quarter financial report to the Board includes a budget to actual comparison and narrative for material variances for all programs listed above, as well as forecasted financial results for the year-ending December 31, 2019.

COST-SHARED PROGRAM FINANCIAL RESULTS

The following is the financial information for the Cost-Shared programs including Vector-Borne Diseases and Small Drinking Water Systems for the period January 1, 2019 to September 30, 2019 with forecasted financial results for the year-ending December 31, 2019.

  2019 Budget YTD Budget September 30, 2019 Forecasted December 31, 2019 Variance September 30, 2019 Variance Forecasted December 31, 2019
Salaries 13,255,133 9,941,350 8,427,236 12,000,919 1,514,114 1,254,214
Employee benefits 3,575,890 2,681,918 2,348,178 3,231,358 333,740 344,532
Travel and meetings 48,752 36,564 5,910 19,374 30,654 29,378
Mileage 216,425 162,319 131,704 169,427 30,615 46,998
Professional development 109,100 81,825 25,943 48,690 55,882 60,410
Association and membership fees 45,000 33,750 34,457 43,833 (707) 1,167
Office supplies 40,000 30,000 23,362 42,000 6,638 (2,000)
Program supplies 714,626 535,970 457,760 938,202 78,210 (223,576)
Office equipment rental 142,000 106,500 77,907 129,862 28,593 12,138
Advertising and promotion 8,500 6,375 709 1,362 5,666 7,138
Purchased services 105,310 78,983 65,787 101,887 13,196 3,424
Board expenses 22,450 16,838 11,390 17,211 5,448 5,239
Professional fees 143,300 107,475 162,904 259,912 (55,429) (116,612)
Bank charges 20,000 15,000 14,346 18,766 654 1,234
Rent 770,000 577,500 575,878 766,215 1,622 3,785
Building maintenance 161,300 120,975 116,011 160,097 4,964 1,203
Utilities 155,000 116,250 93,677 135,857 22,573 19,143
Taxes 221,000 165,750 173,125 211,378 (7,375) 9,622
Insurance 83,500 62,625 79,749 79,749 (17,124) 3,751
Telephone 121,200 90,900 69,929 103,005 20,971 18,195
Security 17,500 13,125 51,445 53,396 (38,320) (35,896)
Vehicle expenses 2,100 1,575 694 911 881 1,189
Postage and freight 33,500 25,125 20,540 34,614 4,585 (1,114)
Parking 91,000 68,250 68,362 91,000 (112) -
  20,102,586 15,076,940 13,037,002 18,665,201 2,039,938 1,437,385
Offset revenue (200,000) (150,000) (143,510) (187,173) (6,490) (12,827)
  19,902,586 14,926,940 12,893,492 18,478,028 2,033,448 1,437,385
Vector-Borne Diseases 350,000 262,500 155,408 182,243 107,092 242,908
  20,252,586 15,189,440 13,048,900 18,660,271 2,140,540 1,667,466

For the period January 1, 2019 to September 30, 2019, cash flows relating to the 2019 program year are as follows:

Ministry of Health

$10,445,165

Corporation of the City of Windsor

2,349,140

Corporation of the County of Essex

1,745,296

Corporation of the Township of Pelee

1,695

 

$14,541,296

 

At September 30, 2019, the variance from budget to actual total expenditures amounted to $2,033,408. Specific variances are as follows:

  • Salaries and Employee benefits:  Expenditures in these financial captions relate to salaries and benefits paid to the WECHU staff in service of the Mandatory Cost-Shared Program.  The combined variance from budget of $1,847,854 is attributed to: 
    • Labour disruption involving the WECHU staff represented by the Ontario Nurses Association (“ONA”) for the period March 8th, 2019 to May 8th, 2019 (approximate savings of $996,000);
    • Given the uncertainty that arose with the April 11th, 2019, Ontario Provincial Budget, certain positions, predominantly non-union, remained unfilled (approximate savings of $450,000 );
    • Gapping resulting from vacancies (i.e. extended recruitment processes; voluntary departures; unpaid leaves; back-filling positions for unpaid leaves); 
    • Gapping due to under utilization of certain other compensation related provisions (i.e. overtime, benefits, etc.) (approximate savings of $110,441).
  • Travel and meetings, Mileage, Professional Development:  The combined variance associated with these financial captions was $117,151.  The aforementioned labour disruption had an impact on these financial captions, causing the WECHU to reprioritize certain less essential activities for those more critical to client service delivery, both during and subsequent to the labour disruption.   Adding to this was the release of the Ontario Provincial Budget, and the austerity measures that the WECHU put in place to ensure that financial resources would only be directed to mandatory travel, meetings and professional development (similar to those put in place by the Province of Ontario).
  • Program supplies:   Expenditures in this financial caption support the activities of the departments, those that directly support Public Health Programs as well as those “support” departments such as Information Technology and Communications.  At September 30, 2019, the variance compared to budget amounted to $78,210 and can be attributed to:  i) The aforementioned labour disruption; ii) Timing of program activities. 
  • Professional fees:  Expenditures in this financial caption include legal, audit and consulting fees paid to third parties.  The budget variance in Professional fees relates to an increase in legal costs to support the WECHU with collective bargaining (ONA only) and during the labour disruption (approximate impact $114,090). 
  • Office equipment rental:  Expenditures in this financial caption include the WECHU’s contractual lease payments on account of multi-function copiers and a large format printer used to support client service delivery.  While the monthly contractual lease payments are consistent (approximately 44% of the 2019 annual budget or $62,480) the overage costs (the term used to describe utilization) vary depending upon the print volume. 
  • Utilities and Telephone:  Expenditures in these financial statement captions include utilities for the Windsor and Leamington offices as well as all telecommunication (mobile, broadband, etc.).  The variance at September 30, 2019 of $43,544 is due to lower than anticipated usage coupled with certain cost-saving measures undertaken by the WECHU.
  • Security:  Expenditures in this financial caption include security costs contracted on an as needed basis for after-hours events at our Windsor office location.  The WECHU incurred additional security costs of $46,984 for the period March 8, 2019 to May 8th, 2019, on account of the labour disruption.

In addition to the budget to actual analysis above, the WECHU has provided forecasted financial results for the year-ending December 31, 2019.  These forecasted financial results consider actual year-to-date results at November 30, 2019, as well as estimates of expenditures for the remaining 31-day period.  Total forecasted expenditures for the year-ending December 31, 2019 are anticipated to be $1,424,558 underspent when compared to budget.  Material variances between forecast to budgeted financial results are detailed below:

  • Salaries and Employee benefits: For the year-ended December 31, 2019, Salaries and Employee benefits are forecasted to be $1,592,568 underspent.  This is attributed to:
    • The aforementioned labour disruption (approximate savings of $996,000);
    • Austerity measures taken by the WECHU resulting from the release of the 2019 Ontario Provincial Budget (approximate savings of $617,526);
    • Gapping resulting from vacancies (i.e. extended recruitment processes; voluntary departures; unpaid leaves; back-filling positions for unpaid leaves); 
    • Finalization of negotiations with the WECHU employees represented by the Canadian Union of Public Sector Employees (“CUPE”) resulting in a one-time bonus to said staff.  The Board of Health approved a one-time bonus to the non-union group of the same amount (approximate impact of $126,000).
  • Program supplies:  For the year-ended December 31, 2019, Program supplies are forecasted to be overspent by $223,576.  This is primarily attributed to:
    • Costs associated with translation of the WECHU’s food handler courses into multiple languages (approximate impact of $17,000).
    • Implementation costs associated with the Ceridian Dayforce Project (approximate impact of $26,000).
    • Acquisition of two vaccine fridges to replace existing vaccine fridges nearing “end of life” (approximate impact of $21,042).
    • Acquisition of nicotine replacement therapy/tobacco cessation supports (approximate impact of $50,000).
    • Acquisition of information technology hardware (i.e. computers, servers, etc.) to replace existing equipment before “end of life” due to hardware defects (approximate impact of $30,000) and accelerating replacement to reduce budgetary pressures in 2020 (approximate impact of $20,000).
  • Professional fees:  For the year-ended December 31, 2019, Professional fees are forecasted to be overspent by $116,612.  The forecasted variance in Professional fees is attributed to the labour disruption. 
  • Security:  For the year-ended December 31, 2019, Security is forecasted to be overspent $35,896.  The forecasted variance in Security is attributed to the labour disruption.

HEALTHY BABIES HEALTHY CHILDREN PROGRAM FINANCIAL RESULTS

  2019 Budget YTD Budget September 30, 2019 September 30, 2018 Variance 2019 Budget
Salaries and benefits 2,629,189 1,971,892 1,628,323 1,826,354 343,569
Mileage 60,000 45,000 36,672 36,443 8,328
Travel and meetings 3,000 2,250 92 7,678 2,158
Professional development 10,400 7,800 1,220 21,408 6,580
Program supplies 38,252 28,689 12,997 6,425 15,692
Purchased services 15,000 11,250 3,379 4,350 7,871
  2,755,841 2,066,881 1,682,683 1,902,658 384,198
           
Funding - MCCSS (2,755,841) (2,066,881) (2,066,885) (2,066,885) 4
  - - (384,202) (164,227) 384,202

The Healthy Babies/Healthy Children Program is funded through the Ministry of Children, Community and Social Services.  This Program supports 27.0 FTEs comprised of managers (2), nurses (17), family home visitors (4), social worker (1), and support staff (3).  The objective of the Program is to ensure a healthy future for children and their families. 

For the period January 1, 2019 to September 30, 2019, the HBHC program underspent compared to budget in the amount of $384,202.  Factors contributing this include:  i) Labour disruption involving the WECHU staff represented by the ONA for the period March 8th, 2019 to May 8th, 2019.  This resulted in a variance in Salaries and benefits of approximately $280,000 and Mileage of $6,000 and likely attributed to under utilization of Professional development of $6,580 and Program supplies of $15,692;  ii)  Lower than anticipated Purchased services (i.e. translation) because of our use of an Arabic speaking nurse to address the needs of our community.

As reported at the November 4th, 2019, Budget meeting, the MCCSS modified the funding year for this Program from the calendar year to an April to March timeframe, aligning the funding year to the Province of Ontario’s fiscal year.  It is the WECHU’s understanding that reporting for this Program will be for the 15-months ending, March 31, 2020.  Administration will report forecasted financial results in February of 2020 for this program.

NURSE PRACTITIONER PROGRAMS

  2019 Budget YTD Budget September 30, 2019 September 30, 2018 Variance 2019 Budget
Salaries and benefits 146,617 109,963 85,217 101,671 24,746
Mileage - - 181 - 181
  146,617 109,963 85,398 101,671 24,565
Funding - MCCSS (139,000) (104,250) (104,254) (104,254) 4
  7,617 5,713 (18,856) (2,583) 24,569

The Nurse Practitioner Program is funded through the Ministry of Children, Community and Social Services.  This Program supports 1 FTE (nurse practitioner).  The objectives of the Program are to promote healthy pregnancy, birth and infancy for children, improve parenting and family supports, strengthen early childhood development, learning and care.

At September 30, 2019, this Program is underspent by $24,569 due to the labour disruption involving the WECHU staff represented by the ONA for the period March 8th, 2019 to May 8th, 2019.

As reported at the November 4th, 2019, Budget meeting, the MCCSS modified the funding year for this Program from the calendar year to an April to March timeframe, aligning the funding year to the Province of Ontario’s fiscal year.  It is the WECHU’s understanding that reporting for this Program will be for the 15-months ending, March 31, 2020.  Administration will report forecasted financial results in February of 2020 for this program.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION FOR RELATED PROGRAMS FUNDED 100% BY THE MINISTRY OF HEALTH

  2019 Budget YTD Budget Actual September 30, 2019 Forecasted December 31, 2019 Variance September 30, 2019 Variance Forecasted December 31, 2019
  Salaries and benefits 1,207,326 905,495 866,391 1,185,063 39,104 22,263
  Admin and accommodation 31,445 23,584 23,584 31,445 - -
  Travel and meetings 8,000 6,000 361 500 5,639 7,500
  Mileage 10,000 7,500 10,498 13,429 (2,998) (3,429)
  Professional development 5,500 4,125 2,386 3,024 1,739 2,476
  Association and membership fees 300 225 535 535 (310) (235)
  Office supplies 4,500 3,375 44 500 3,331 4,000
  Program supplies 100,229 75,172 107,981 158,591 (32,809) (58,362)
  Purchased services 162,400 121,800 91,075 136,613 30,725 25,787
  Total expenditures 1,529,700 1,147,275 1,102,855 1,529,700 44,420 -
  Funding - Ministry of Health (1,529,700) (1,147,275) (1,147,281) (1,529,700) 6 -
    - - (44,426) - 44,426 -

The Healthy Smiles Ontario (“HSO”) program is funded through the Ministry of Health.  This program supports 14.25 FTEs comprised of a manager (0.75), dental assistants (5.5), dental hygienists (5.5), a health promotion specialist (0.5), and support staff (2).  This program provides preventative, routine, and emergency and essential dental treatment for children and youth, from low-income families, who are 17 years of age and under.

For the period January 1, 2019 to September 30, 2019, the HSO budget is underspent $44,426.  The most notable variances are as follows:

  • A variance of $39,104 related to Salaries and benefits.  This is due to the reallocation of FTE resources to other program initiatives such as the Ontario Seniors Dental Program (approximate savings of $21,645) as well as gapping resulting from timing of recruitment (approximate savings of $7,500).
  • A variance of $32,809 related to Program supplies.  The timing of the acquisition of Program supplies varies annually. 
  • A variance of $30,725 related to Purchased Services, which includes professional services provided by dentists as well as translation.  As reported in at Q1 of 2019, there were fewer available dentists’ hours in the months of February and March.  Subsequent to March 31, 2019, additional dentists’ hours are available. 

Forecasted financial results for the year-ending December 31, 2019, indicate that the HSO program budget will be fully expended with amounts from Salaries and benefits being redirected to fund operating expenditures (more specifically Program supplies).

  2019 Budget YTD Budget Actual September 30, 2019 Forecasted December 31, 2019 Variance September 30, 2019 Variance Forecasted December 31, 2019
Salaries and benefits 546,350 409,763 413,762 577,709 (3,999) (31,359)
Mileage 30,000 22,500 25,382 35,680 (2,882) (5,680)
Travel and meetings 3,045 2,284 784 2,392 1,500 653
Professional development 3,380 2,535 - - 2,535 3,380
Program supplies 28,725 21,544 7,315 36,077 14,229 (7,352)
Purchased services 25,200 18,900 12,525 22,992 6,375 2,208
Total expenditures 636,700 477,525 459,768 674,850 17,757 (38,150)
Funding - Ministry of Health (636,700) (477,525) (466,779) (636,700) (10,746) -
  - - (7,011) 38,150 7,011 (38,150)

Base funding for the Smoke-Free Ontario Strategy Initiative must be used in the planning and implementation of comprehensive tobacco control activities across prevention, cessation, prosecution, and protection and enforcement at the local and regional levels.  Boards of Health must comply and adhere to the Smoke-Free Ontario Strategy: Public Health Unit Tobacco Control Program Guidelines and the Directives:  Enforcement of the Smoke-Free Ontario Act. 

At September 30, 2019, this program is underspent by $17,757.   In May of 2019, the Ministry of Health approved certain one-time funding up to March 31, 2019 for cannabis related activities.  The total one-time funding approval amounted to $96,700, of which, $37,656 was expended in fiscal 2018, and $44,158 was expended in Q1 of 2019, thus taking pressure off the calendar 2019 budget for this program initiative.  

Forecasted financial results for the year-ending December 31, 2019, indicate that this program budget will be overspent $38,150.  This overage relates to an additional FTE resource (Tobacco Enforcement Officer) added for fiscal 2019 only, to assist with increased work load with the legalization of cannabis in October of 2018.  The overage for this program will be funded from the Cost-Shared Mandatory Program Budget.

  2019 Budget YTD Budget Actual September 30, 2019 Forecasted December 31, 2019 Variance September 30, 2019 Variance Forecasted December 31, 2019
Nursing Initiative 437,253 327,940 264,498 392,100 63,442 45,153
Enhanced Food Safety - Haines Initiative 53,800 40,350 42,269 53,800 (1,919) -
Enhanced Safe Water 32,900 24,675 13,786 32,900 10,889 -
Harm Reduction Program Enhancement 250,000 187,500 170,378 228,760 17,122 21,240
Infectious Diseases Control Initiative 466,517 349,888 326,924 444,304 22,964 22,213
Needle Exchange Program Initiative 63,000 47,250 47,250 63,000 - -
Total expenditures 1,303,470 977,603 865,105 1,214,864 112,497 88,606
Funding - Ministry of Health (1,253,500) (940,125) (940,146) (1,253,500) 21 -
  49,970 37,478 (75,041) (38,636) 112,518 88,606

A description of other related programs is included below:

Nursing Initiative: The Amending Agreement for 2019 received August 20, 2019, aggregates the following program initiatives under “Nursing Initiatives”.  These include:  the Chief Nursing Officer Initiative; the Infection Prevention and Control Nursing Initiative; and the Social Determinants of Health Nursing Initiative.  Base funding for these initiatives support the salaries and benefits of 4 nursing FTE’s or greater, with certain specific qualifications.  At September 30, 2019, the aggregate underspent budget amounted to $63,442, which resulted from the labour disruption involving the WECHU staff represented by the ONA for the period of March 8th, 2019 to May 8th, 2019.  At December 31, 2019, this program initiative is forecasted to be underspent by $45,153.  The 2019 budget for this initiative included salary and benefit overages ($45,153) associated with three of the four assigned FTEs, which, subsequent to the labour disruption, are forecasted to be negated.

Enhanced Food Safety – Haines Initiative:  This initiative was established to support implementing the Food Safety Program Standard under the Ontario Public Health Standards (“OPHS”).  At September 30, 2019, there is a minor negative variance of $1,919 due to timing of purchases.  This program initiative is not forecasted to be overspent at December 31, 2019.   

Enhanced Safe Water:  This initiative was established to increase the Board of Health’s capacity to meet the requirements of the Safe Water Program Standard under the OPHS.  At September 30, 2019, there is no negative variance to report on.   This program initiative is not forecasted to be overspent at December 31, 2019.

Harm Reduction Program Enhancement:  Base funding for this initiative supports the Board of Health in the activities associated with its Local Opioid Strategy.  More specifically it supports 2.5 FTEs dedicated to working on activities associated with:  i) Our local opioid response; ii) Naloxone Distribution and Training;  iii)  Opioid Overdose Early Warning and Surveillance.   At September 30, 2019, the budget for this program initiative is underspent by $17,122, which resulted from the labour disruption involving employees represented by the ONA (approximately $15,000) for the period March 8th, 2019 to May 8th, 2019.  At December 31, 2019, this program initiative is forecasted to be underspent $21,240.  In addition to the labour disruption noted above, gapping associated with certain other positions resulted.  Recruitment is currently underway but is not anticipated to be concluded before year-end.

Infectious Disease Control Initiative:  This initiative was established to support the hiring of infectious diseases control positions (4.5 FTEs) and supporting these staff to monitor and control infectious diseases.  They serve to enhance the Board of Health’s ability to handle and coordinate increased activities related to outbreak management.  At September 30, 2019, the budget for this program initiative is underspent by $22,964, which resulted from the labour disruption involving employees represented by the ONA for the period March 8th, 2019 to May 8th, 2019.  The 2019 budget for this initiative included salary and benefit overages ($4,817) associated with the 4.5 FTEs allocated to this program, which, subsequent to the labour disruption, are forecasted to be negated.

Needle Exchange Program Initiative:  This initiative was established to support the purchase of needles and syringes, and their associated disposal costs, for the Board of Health’s Needle Exchange Program.  At September 30, 2019, there are no negative variances to report on. This program initiative is not forecasted to be overspent at December 31, 2019.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION FOR RELATED PROGRAMS FUNDED 100% BY THE MINISTRY OF HEALTH

  2019/2020 Budget YTD Actual June 30, 2019 Variance to Budget % Spent
Mandatory Programs: Enhanced Mosquito Surveillance 60,000 27,805 32,195 53.6%
New Purpose-Built Vaccine Refrigerators 11,600 10,521 1,079 90.7%
Public Health Inspector Practicum 10,000 10,000 - 100%

Mandatory Programs - Enhanced Mosquito Surveillance: 

This one-time funding supports an enhanced surveillance program.  Eligible costs include salaries for students, supplies and additional equipment, identification and testing expenses, promotional costs and mileage.  At September 30, 2019, there are no negative variances to report on. 

New Purpose-Built Vaccine Refrigerators: 

This one-time funding supports the acquisition of one new twenty-five (25) cubic foot purpose-built refrigerator used to store publicly funded vaccines.  At September 30, 2019, the new purpose-built vaccine refrigerator has been acquired.  No additional costs are anticipated.

Public Health Inspector Practicum Program: 

This one-time funding supports the hiring of approved Public Health Inspector Practicum positions.  Eligible costs include student salaries, wages and benefits, transportation expenses associated with practicum positions, equipment and educational expenses.  This funding relates to practicum placements for the four-month period, which commenced May of 2019 and concluded in August of 2019.  At September 30, 2019, the funding has been expended.

APPROVED BY

Theresa Marentette, CEO


View Document page

Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

December 3, 2019

Subject:

November Media Relations Recap Report

November Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

86

Interview Requests

38

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

42
Requests for Information 6

November 2019 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

November 2019 Media Relations Recap - Story Source

Media Coverage

Media Outlet

Number of Requests/Stories

AM 800

15

Blackburn

12

CBC

19

CTV

13

Lakeshore News

1

Radio-Canada (French)

2

St. Clair College/Mediaplex

7

University of Windsor News

1

Windsor Star

15

Windsorite.ca

1

TOTAL

86

News Release, Media Advisories and Media Statements

Date Type Headline Response

November 1, 2019

Media Advisory

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health Budget Meeting

6 Stories Reported

November 19, 2019

Media Advisory

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health Meeting at Essex Office

3 Stories Reported

November 20, 2019

News Release

Flu Season is Here!

2 Stories Reported

November 21, 2019

WECOSS: Media Advisory

Community Opioid and Substance Strategy Launches Youth Cannabis Awareness Program

4 Stories Reported

November 25, 2019

WECOSS: News Release

Community Opioid and Substance Strategy Launches Youth Cannabis Awareness Program

1 Story Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Publish Date

Title

November 1, 2019

Layoffs Loom At Local Health Unit

November 1, 2019

Alert Issued After A High Number Of Overdoses

November 4, 2019

Video: Health Unit Board Approves 'Austerity Budget'

November 5, 2019

Lakeshore Residents Divided On Retail Cannabis Stores

November 7, 2019

Another Overdose Alert Issued For Windsor-Essex

November 7, 2019

MPP Gretzky Raises Concerns Over Health Unit Cuts

November 7, 2019

Dealing With Drug Overdoses A Daily Norm At WRH

November 12, 2019

Video: Health Unit Evacuates Westcourt Place

November 15, 2019

More Opioid Related ED Visits

November 20, 2019

Flu Season Is Here Warns Windsor-Essex County Health Unit

November 22, 2019

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Declares Climate Change Emergency

November 22, 2019

No Sign Of The Flu So Far In Windsor-Essex

November 23, 2019

Video: Local Boards Deal With Lead In Water At Several Schools

November 25, 2019

Substance Abuse Strategy To 'Empower' Youth In Windsor-Essex

November 25, 2019

Video: Local Video Helps Children Deal With Mental Health In The Family

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

November 1, 2019

Alert Issued In Windsor-Essex For Drug-Related Hospital Visits

November 5, 2019

Lakeshore Weighs In On Retail Pot

November 5, 2019

Battle Over Laid-Off Nurses Reaches Queen Park

November 6, 2019

Gretzky: Econ Statement Doesn't Address Cuts, Disabilities

November 7, 2019

Second Overdose Alert Issued In Winsor-Essex

November 7, 2019

Opioid Overdoses Taking Toll On Staff, Says Hospital

November 12, 2019

Update: Health Unit Calls For Evacuation Of Fire-Affected Building

November 12, 2019

RNAO CEO Addresses

November 15, 2019

Class Action Lawsuit To Be Filed In Westcourt Place Fire

November 15, 2019

‘This Is A Business That Will Open'

November 25, 2019

Youth Cannabis Awareness Program Launched

November 29, 2019

Municipal Leaders Meet To Discuss Climate Change

CBC News

Note: Digital stories were not available for nine of CBC’s requests.

Publish Date

Title

November 1, 2019

Health Unit Nurses Handed Layoff Notices In Windsor

November 5, 2019

Nice To Have That Option': Windsorites Support Legislation That Would Permit Dogs On Patios

November 4, 2019

As Lean As We Can Be': Windsor-Essex Health Unit's 2020 Budget Has Roughly $500,000 Shortfall

November 8, 2019

City Of Windsor Opposes Proposed Downtown Cannabis Retail Store Location

November 11, 2019

Open, Closed And Remembrance Day Ceremonies In Windsor-Essex

November 12, 2019

Windsor Councillor To Raise Questions About Cannabis Retail Store At Next Council Meeting

November 15, 2019

10 Drug-Related Visits To Emergency Department In Just One Day, Says Windsor-Essex Health Unit

November 18, 2019

City Council, Not Administration, Will Deal With Proposed Cannabis Locations

November 25, 2019

Higher Education: Cannabis Awareness Program For Youth Launches In Windsor-Essex

December 1, 2019

HIV Infection Decline In Windsor-Essex In 2019

CTV Windsor News

Note: Digital stories were not available for two of CTV’s requests.

Publish Date

Title

November 1, 2019

Layoffs Expected At Windsor Essex County Health Unit

November 1, 2019

Alert Issued After 5 Opioid-Related ER Visits In Windsor-Essex

November 4, 2019

Health Unit Board Approves Lean 2020 Budget

November 7, 2019

Another Alert Issued Over Opioid-Related ER Visits

November 7, 2019

Online Tool Launched To Help People Overcome Substance Abuse Addictions

November 8, 2019

Flu Vaccine Shortage For Staff Reported At Windsor Regional Hospital

November 12, 2019

Downtown Windsor High-Rise Evacuated For The Nigh After Car Fire

November 15, 2019

10 Drug-Related Visits, Naloxone Used Twice By Windsor-Essex EMS Over Past Day

November 22, 2019

Windsor-Essex School Boards Deal With Lead In Water At Several Schools

November 20, 2019

Flu Season Is Here Warns Windsor-Essex County Health Unit

November 22, 2019

List Grows Of Climate Change Emergency Declarations In Windsor-Essex

St. Clair College/Mediaplex

Note: Digital stories were not available for five of St. Clair College’s requests.

Publish Date Title

November 5, 2019

Health Unit Warns Of Spike In Windsor Opioid Cases

November 13, 2019

Opioid Overdose Alerts In Windsor

University of Windsor News​​​​​​​

Publish Date Title

November 29, 2019

Study To Focus On Cancer Patients In The Workplace

Windsor Star

Note: Digital stories were not available for three of Windsor Star’s requests.

Publish Date Title

November 1, 2019

Health Unit Issues Public Alert After Five Opioid Overdoses In Two Days

November 4, 2019

Health Unit Board Sets 2020 Budget

November 5, 2019

Health Unit's 2020 Budget Calls For Layoffs, Increased Funding By Municipalities

November 7, 2019

Overdose Alert For Windsor Upgraded By Local Watchdog Group

November 7, 2019

Windsor Regional Hospital Gets $1.6-Million To Open 20 Extra Beds During Flu Season

November 8, 2019

Frustration, Surprise At City Opposition To Ouellette Ave. Cannabis Store Location

November 13, 2019

Data Does Not Support Need For Police To Carry Naloxone, Dilkens Says

November 13, 2019

Downtown Councillor Vows To Challenge Planner's 'Judgement Call' Opposing Pot Store

November 15, 2019

Jarvis: Pot Store Decision An End Run Around Democracy

November 18, 2019

Council Takes Back Authority To Oppose/Endorse Cannabis Stores

November 26, 2019

Local Leaders Gather For Climate Action Symposium

November 30, 2019

Ontario Nurses Group Launches Petition To Get Windsor Police To Carry Naloxone

Windsorite.ca

Publish Date Title

November 1, 2019

Alert Issued After High Number Of Overdoses Reported

Note: Digital stories were not available for the Lakeshore News request (1), or Radio-Canada’s requests (2),

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy, Marc Tortola, and Michael Janisse.


View Document page

Prepared By:

Darcie Renaud, Performance Improvement & Accountability Coordinator (PIAC), Planning & Strategic Initiatives Department

Date:

December 19, 2019

Subject:

2019 Operational Plan Reporting Q3 Status 

BACKGROUND

In 2018, the Ministry of Health, introduced a new Annual Service Plan (ASP) that Health Units are required to submit each year. An electronic planning and reporting system was created to support the development of the ASP and to monitor operational plan progress throughout the year. In this system, work plans are developed for all public health interventions. These interventions directly address the programs provided by the WECHU. The WECHU’s ASP provides details about planned expenditures and program plans for 2019, including 268 initially planned interventions tied to 61 programs. The Ministry of Health requires program activity and financial reports in Q2 and Q4 of the implementation year, and an annual summary report. In addition, status updates are provided for interventions quarterly. 

CURRENT INITIATIVES

The appended report reflects the quarterly Board of Health summary report for Q3 of 2019. This report includes overall status information for the 223 interventions that were in progress in Q3 of 2019. A majority of the interventions were either on target or completed, though some interventions were cancelled or deferred until the following year. Proposed changes to public health operations and the 2019 labour disruption continued to influence the progress of some interventions, though to a lesser degree than in Q2. The most common reason given for deferral, cancellation, or variance was human resource issues (35%), followed by adjusted program priorities (27%), and the 2019 labour disruption (18%). Further detail is provided about the status of programs based on the related interventions that were planned for in Q3 of 2019.

CONSULTATION

The following individuals contributed to this report:

  • Marc Frey, Manager, Planning & Strategic Initiatives

APPROVED BY:

Theresa Marentette, CEO


View Document page

WECHU Strategic Plan Progress - At a Glance

Communication and Awareness

Objective

2019 Q3

1.1. 60% of survey respondents are aware of the programs and services offered by the WECHU by 2021.

Progressing

1.2 60% of survey respondents have seen or heard about the WECHU by 2021.

Progressing

1.3 60% of survey respondents are satisfied with internal communication efforts in the WECHU by 2021.

Progressing

Organizational Development

Objective

2019 Q3

3.1. A minimum of 2 organization-wide quality improvement activities will occur annually through to 2021.

Progressing

3.2. 100% of the WECHU staff are trained in change management strategies by 2021.

Progressing

3.3. 100% of corporate risks identified as high have mitigation strategies developed and implemented by 2021

Progressing

3.4. 80% of the WECHU staff have a positive view of organizational culture by 2021.

Progressing

Partnerships

Objective

2019 Q3

2.1. 100% of program/service driven departments implement a formal feedback process with at least one external partnership by 2021.

Progressing

2.2. At least 20% of activities in the operational plan identify formal internal partnerships by 2021.

Progressing

Evidence-based Public Health Practice

Objective

2019 Q3

4.1. 100% of departments collect corporate level client satisfaction data by 2021.

Progressing

4.2. 100% of the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) 2018 program areas have at least one activity focused on healthy public policy development by 2021.

Progressing

4.3. 100% of the OPHS population health assessment requirements (7), the research, knowledge exchange, and communication requirements (3) and the related protocols are being addressed by 2021.

Progressing

4.4. 100% of our programs and service departments have adopted a health equity approach to an activity by 2021.

Progressing

Communication and Awareness

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q3 UPDATE

1.1 Strengthen the community’s awareness of our programs and services by developing and implementing a corporate communications strategy.

60% of survey respondents are aware of the programs and services offered by the WECHU by 2021.

In Q3, 70% of respondents to the 2019 Corporate External Client Experience Survey reported being somewhat to very familiar with Health Unit programs and services. 
The proposed merger of public health units has halted the development of a formal marketing and communications strategy for the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit. The WECHU is working to strengthen specific marketing and communication tactics identified in the Community Needs Assessment, i.e., email marketing.

1.2 Increase the WECHU’s visibility by developing and implementing a community engagement approach.

60% of survey respondents have seen or heard about the WECHU by 2021.

In Q3, 64% of respondents to the 2019 Corporate External Client Experience Survey reported having seen or heard about the WECHU in the last 3 months. The proposed merger of public health units has halted the development of a formal  community engagement approach. We remain committed to providing engaging content and client service to the community through our current media channels.

1.3 Improve communication within the WECHU by developing and implementing an internal communication strategy.

A Net Promoter Score (Internal Communications) greater than 30

In Q3, the Average Net Promoter Score for internal communications was 15.34.

Redevelopment of the intranet is underway by the Communications department. 

Partnerships

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q3 UPDATE

2.1 Increase the effectiveness of partnerships through formal feedback mechanisms.

100% of program/service driven departments implement a formal feedback process with at least one external partnership by 2021.

The E&E department has developed and implemented a process to track and evaluate external partnerships. This process has been integrated into the 2020 planning process.

2.2 Increase the number of internal partnerships.

At least 20% of activities in the operational plan identify formal internal partnerships by 2021.

The E&E department has implemented a process to track and evaluate all internal partnerships, and incorporated the process into the 2020 planning process. 

Organizational Development

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q3 UPDATE

3.1 Improve performance by striving towards operational excellence and a focus on continuous quality improvement.

A minimum of 2 organization-wide quality improvement activities will occur annually through to 2021.

Improvements have been completed and were used in the 2019 planning approach. In consideration of the proposed merger of public health units (PHUs), work towards Silver Level Accreditation has been deferred, but preliminary work has been completed to develop a Continuous Quality Improvement framework that aligns with approaches being taken by other PHUs across Ontario.

 

3.2 Increase our readiness to adapt to internal and external factors through effective change management practices.

100% of the WECHU staff are trained in change management strategies by 2021.

In Fall 2019, staff will be able to self-select to participate in professional development opportunities related to navigating change. Next steps related to meeting the goal for this strategic objective will be considered, with recommendations developed in 2020. 

3.3 Enhance our understanding and monitoring efforts of identified corporate risks to embrace opportunities, create flexibility, and preserve organizational assets.

 

100% of corporate risks identified as high have mitigation strategies developed and implemented by 2021

Of the 15 total work plans developed to address corporate risks, 73% are on target or are complete. In total, 3 of the 4 mitigation work plans for the high (inherent) risks are on target or are complete. 

3.4 Improve organizational culture through people development and employee engagement strategies.

A Net Promotor Score (Engagement) greater than 30

In Q3, the Net Promoter Score for engagement was 5.56. Alterations to corporate communication and engagement efforts are in progress. Further effort in these areas will continue throughout the year.

Evidence-Based Public Health Practice

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q3 UPDATE

4.1 Establish organizational supports for client-centered service strategies.

100% of departments collect corporate level client satisfaction data by 2021.

Aspects of this objective continue to be on hold in Q3 due to staffing changes. However, some client experience related corporate measurement approaches are in the process of implementation. Initial plans for thorough client experience measurement procedures will be developed in this calendar year.

4.2 Develop and implement a framework to support healthy public policy.

100% of the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) 2018 program areas have at least one activity focused on healthy public policy development by 2021.

There were 6 activities focused on healthy public policy completed in Q3 under the Chronic Diseases Prevention and Well-Being Standard, Substance Use and Injury Prevention Standard, and Healthy Environments Standard. There are activities focused on healthy public policy in progress under the Chronic Diseases Prevention and Well-being Standard, Substance Use and Injury Prevention Standard, the Healthy Environments Standard, School Health Standard and the Healthy Growth and Development Standard.

4.3 Enhance local data collection efforts and analysis to support knowledge exchange both internally and externally.

100% of the OPHS population health assessment requirements (7), the research, knowledge exchange, and communication requirements (3) and the related protocols are being addressed by 2021.

Work plans created in M-Files through the 2020 planning process are being tracked and updated with the reflected OPHS standards. Review to be completed in Q4.

4.4 Develop and implement protocols that ensure all programs and services are using a health equity approach.

100% of our programs and service departments have adopted a health equity approach to an activity by 2021.

89% of programs have adopted a health equity approach.


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Prepared By:

Darcie Renaud, Performance Improvement & Accountability Coordinator (PIAC), Planning & Strategic Initiatives Department

Date:

December 19, 2019

Subject:

Q3 Strategic Plan Report

BACKGROUND

The 2017-2021 WECHU Strategic Plan sets out our plan to enhance our delivery of quality public health programs and services to all residents in Windsor and Essex County. The current strategic plan details our organization’s vision, mission, values, and our four strategic priorities. Each quarter, the Board of Health (BoH) receives a report on the status of progress made towards the Strategic Priorities in that quarter.

CURRENT INITIATIVES

The 2019 Q3 Strategic Plan Progress Report provides the objectives under each strategic priority with corresponding updates to measure our advancement towards achieving the goal. Progress has continued on many of the strategic objectives, however, uncertainty around the proposed merger of public health units by the Ontario government has resulted in the delay and/or deferral of a number of plans related to the WECHU’s strategic objectives.

CONSULTATION

The following individuals contributed to this report:

  • Marc Frey, Manager, Planning & Strategic Initiatives 
  • Michael Janisse, Manager, Communications
  • Ramsay D’Souza, Manager, Evaluation & Epidemiology

APPROVED BY:

Theresa Marentette, CEO


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Reporting Structure

This report provides a status summary for all of the 2019 Annual Service Plan program interventions that were in progress in Q3 (July 1st to September 30th).

All active interventions received a status update using the following categories:

  • On Target (the intervention is progressing at the planned pace)
  • Variance (the intervention is behind the planned pace)
  • Complete (the intervention has been completed)
  • Deferred (current work on the intervention has been stopped – with potential to continue next year)
  • Cancelled (the intervention will no longer occur)

If the intervention was identified as ‘Variance’, ‘Deferred’, or ‘Cancelled’, a reason was provided. In these cases, the most relevant reason was selected from the following list:

  • 2019 Labour Disruption (the labour disruption resulted in changes to the intervention)
  • Adjusted Program Priorities (program priority alterations resulted in changes to the intervention)
  • Human Resource Issue (staffing circumstances resulted in changes to the intervention)
  • Partnership Limitations (external partner(s) did not to meet their obligations)
  • Public Health Emergency (a significant public health emergency resulted in changes to the intervention)
  • Resource Limitation (financial, material, or internal support limitations resulted in changes to the intervention)

It is important to note that reporting reflects a summary of progress made on interventions based on the predetermined milestones for the intervention. This does not necessarily represent the amount or scope of work captured under each program.

Operational Plan Status Summary

Overall Quarterly Status Summary

There were 223 interventions in progress in Q3 2019. Figure 1 displays the percentage of interventions that were on target, reported a variance, were deferred, were cancelled, or were completed. A majority of interventions (64%) were either completed or on target. This is a slight increase from Q2, when 63% of plans were reported as completed or on target. 

Intervention Status by Status Type (Q3 2019)

Of the 223 interventions in progress, 36% (79) were deferred, cancelled, or reported a variance. Figure 2 provides a summary of the reasons for variances, deferrals, or cancellations as a percentage of the total number of variances, deferrals, and cancellations. 

Reason for Cancellation, Deferral, or Variance (Q3 2019)

Proposed changes to public health operations and the 2019 labour disruption continued to influence the progress of some interventions, though to a lesser degree than in Q2. The most common reason given for deferral, cancellation, or variance was human resource issues (35%), followed by adjusted program priorities (27%), and the 2019 labour disruption (18%). Combined, the labour disruption, program priority adjustments, and human resource issues accounted for 80% of the variances, deferrals, or cancellations of interventions. 

In some cases, managers and staff provided comments to further explain the reason for deferral, cancellation, or variance. Examples of human resources issues that affected the status of work plans included expected and unexpected leaves of absence and general staff turnover. When adjusted program priorities were cited, examples provided included the service delivery model change in the Healthy Schools department, changing priorities of partners and partnerships, and a need to focus more staff time than expected on other interventions. 

Program Quarterly Status Summary

All interventions are directly tied to programs and program objectives; Figure 3 displays a summary of the status updates for each WECHU program based on the number of interventions that were on target, varied from target, were completed, were deferred, or were cancelled. 

Intervention Status By Program (Q3 2019)


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